Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

Post-apocalyptic science fiction is set in a world or civilization after such a disaster. The time frame may be immediately after the catastrophe, focusing on the travails or psychology of survivors, or considerably later, often including the theme that the existence of pre-catastrophe civilization has been forgotten or mythologized. Post-apocalyptic stories often take place in an agrarian, non-technological future world, or a world where only scattered elements of technology remain.

There is a considerable degree of blurring between this form of science fiction and that which deals with false utopias or dystopic societies. A work of apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic fiction might also be called a ruined Earth story, or dying Earth if the apocalypse is sufficiently dire.

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Paranormal Romance

Paranormal Romance
These are stories that include any phenomena that lie outside the range of what is normal in our world, and perhaps the most popular within the paranormal realm are Paranormal Romance novels such as Twilight. Some examples of paranormal elements are vampires, shape-shifters, ghosts, time travel, psychics, telekinesis, aliens, and any kind of cryptids (Big Foot or the Loch Ness Monster).

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Mythic Fiction

Mythic Fiction

The sub-sub-genre of mythic fiction refers to titles rooted in fables or mythology. The works are, ultimately, inspired by, or that in some way draws from the tropes, themes and symbolism of myth, folklore, and fairy tales. These could be pantheon-based characterizations, or retellings of famous mythological journeys in fantasy settings.

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Magical Realism

Magical Realism

Magical Realism presents fantastic and mundane elements side-by-side as if there is no conflict between the two. It is often used to punctuate the hidden meaning of mundane realities by means of the fantastic “magical” elements. This sub-genre has close ties to Surrealism and Post-Modernism.

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Juvenile or Young Adult Fantasy

Juvenile or Young Adult Fantasy
The juvenile fantasy sub-genre is a fantasy story written for a younger audience, with appropriately younger characters, i.e. children or teens who have unique abilities, gifts, possessions or even allies. The classic example of the sub-genre is C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia. In the earlier part of the 20th century, C.S. Lewis noted that fantasy was more accepted in juvenile literature, and therefore a writer interested in fantasy often wrote in it to find an audience.

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Horror

Horror

Horror alone can be broken into several different sub-genres, but for the sake of this blog, we are going to use the all inclusive umbrella. Horror fiction also Horror fantasy is a genre of literature, which is intended to, or has the capacity to frighten its readers, scare or startle viewers/readers by inducing feelings of horror and terror. It creates an eerie and frightening atmosphere. Horror can be either supernatural or non-supernatural. The genre has ancient origins which were reformulated in the eighteenth century as Gothic horror.

Supernatural horror has its roots in folklore and religious traditions, focusing on death, the afterlife, evil, the demonic, and the principle of evil embodied in the Devil. These were manifested in stories of ghosts, vampires, werewolves, witches, and demonic pacts.

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Historical Fantasy

Historical Fantasy

This sub-genre is very similar to the “Alternate History” sub-genre. It is a sub-genre in which stories are set in a specified historical period but with some element of fantasy added to the world, such as magic or a mythical creatures or characters. Often the magic retreats from the world so as to allow history to continue unaltered. When the plot alters history, as it were, the story moves into the Alternate History sub-genre.

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Hard Science Fiction

Hard Science Fiction

Hard science fiction, or hard SF, is a sub-genre of science fiction characterized by an interest in scientific detail or accuracy, being the opposite of soft science fiction. It is one of several science fiction themes.

There is a great deal of disagreement among readers and writers over what exactly constitutes an interest in scientific detail. Many hard SF stories focus on the natural sciences and technological developments, but many others leave technology in the background. Others contend that if the technology is left in the background it is an example of soft science fiction. Another distinction within the genre revolves around portrayals of the human condition. Some authors seek to reflect technical accuracy within an advanced, nearly utopian society in which mankind has attained victory over most human ills; others seek to portray the impact of technology on the human race with human defects still firmly in place and sometimes even magnified.

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Gothic Fiction

Gothic Fiction

The early precursor to the Horror genre, the Gothic novel tells tales of mysteries, forbidden loves, ruined castles, moral decay, fallen aristocracies, madmen, and various sorts of spirits.

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